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February 5th 2017 - Last month found us bearded and boiler suited at Spacewolf, recording 'Driving Slow For Jesus' and starting work on a fresh recording of 'Terminal Window' (the Nailsworth demo of which you can hear at https://youtu.be/1eEpeRT93LU). Producer Luke upped a video of us making terrible noises with Rich's homemade Tony Hart art kit modular synth here. Hard as it may be to believe, about 20 seconds later we coaxed some marvellous noises from the unpredictable, uncontrollable beast and sprinkled them over 'Driving Slow For Jesus'. Out surrounded by cows we continue trying to convince ourselves 'How I Learned To Be Free In An Unfree World' is a song normalish humans will enjoy and debtating whether it's that or 'Sci-Fi Violence' that we take back to Spacewolf later this month. We really can't wait to get back there.

It goes without saying that the world is a little more fucked than last month. If you don't agree, this probably isn't the place for you, and nor's our echo chamber. You'll also be unlikely to enjoy this excerpt from Mark Fisher's 'Capitalist Realism'. I thought it was brilliant, and was saddened by the news that led me to find it. As with Zizek, Chomsky, Adam Curtis and the last few seasons of South Park, even if you don't fully buy it, having someone construct a thesis of events that isn't in service to some knee-jerk hate-filled right wing power grab feels important right now.

Mornings I'm spilling my coffee on James Goss's loving take on Douglas Adams's 'The Pirate Planet'. Before the fade I'm pouring over Lion's Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition with Source Code and waking up in the middle of the night lying on my Kindle with old Dark Horse Terminator comics open. I'm wallowing musically in our 80s synth pop heritage plus a lot of Nine Inch Nails. I left the Labour party over Article 50, and greatly enjoyed Halt and Catch Fire. I am realising that this time of year, every year, will always be strange.

THESE SONGS ARE BIG AND FULL OF BILE AND DREAMS AND IDEAS care less talk costs lives